Family history and risk assessment (test version)

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Description: Web implementation of a brief self-completed family history screening tool for common chronic disease prevention in primary care

Publet Introduction:

Family history is an important risk factor for many common chronic diseases, but it remains underutilised for diagnostic assessment and disease prevention in routine primary care. The authors have developed and validated a brief self-completed family history questionnaire (FHQ) for systematic primary care assessment for family history of diabetes, ischaemic heart disease, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer. This brief self-completed FHQ shows good diagnostic accuracy for identifying people at higher risk of four common chronic diseases. It could be used in routine primary care to identify patients who would be most likely to benefit from a more detailed pedigree and risk assessment, and consequent management strategies. 

Authors: Fiona M Walter, A Toby Prevost, Linda Birt, Nicola Grehan, Kathy Restarick, Helen C Morris, Stephen Sutton, Peter Rose, Sarah Downing and Jon D Emery 


  Information
Guideline objectives

Provision of a quick and simple to use assessment of risk of predisposition to common diseases based on family history.

Target setting Potentially anywhere there is a requirement for a quick and simple tool for risk assessment and screening.
Target users Primary care and family physicians and their patients in England
Overview

 Patients who are well but possible predisposition to breast cancer, colo-rectal cancer, diabetes and ischaemic heart disease. 

Provenance 2. Represents authoritative description of best practice (with evidence)
Management
  • Author: Fiona Walter, Jon Emery
  • Release date:
  • Status: Draft - Under Review
  • History: Implementation based on published paper (see reference)
Safety case None available
Sources

Development and evaluation of a brief self-completed family history screening tool for common chronic disease prevention in primary care


Highlights from paper abstract ...
References

British Journal of General Practice, June 2013